/page/2

さつき盆栽花季展 / Satsuki azalea bonsai exhibition

(via onlinebabe)

perpetualartistsblock:

What better way to break out of artist’s block (for now) than with a newly described microraptorine?Here we have Changyuraptor in all it’s stupidly-long-tail-feathered glory.

perpetualartistsblock:

What better way to break out of artist’s block (for now) than with a newly described microraptorine?

Here we have Changyuraptor in all it’s stupidly-long-tail-feathered glory.

(via fuckyeahdinoart)

zerostatereflex:

Jupiter’s Synchrotron Emission 
"Movie made from observations of Jupiter by the radio telescopes of the Very Large Array. Jupiter’s spin axis is offset from its magnetic poles - meaning Jupiter has a "true north" and "magnetic north" like our planet does."

zerostatereflex:

Jupiter’s Synchrotron Emission

"Movie made from observations of Jupiter by the radio telescopes of the Very Large Array. Jupiter’s spin axis is offset from its magnetic poles - meaning Jupiter has a "true north" and "magnetic north" like our planet does."

(via starstuffblog)

vuls:

Copper Splash + Oxide

vuls:

Copper Splash + Oxide

(via ddaughter)

scienceisbeauty:

Tamu Massif, part of the Shatsky Rise in the western Pacific Ocean. Via Ars Technica.
Google Maps:

scienceisbeauty:

Tamu Massif, part of the Shatsky Rise in the western Pacific Ocean. Via Ars Technica.

Google Maps:

(via starstuffblog)

bpod-mrc:

14 July 2014
Buses and Blobs
Just as cities are full of buses – shuttling people around to school, work, play or home – our cells are bustling with tiny transporters that do a similar job. These fluffy-looking balls are zebrafish eggs, stained with a fluorescent dye that reveals these blobby biological buses, known as vesicles, packed with molecules rather than passengers. But there’s a key difference between them – the one on the left is normal, while the one on the right is missing a gene called souffle (also known as spastizin), so the vesicles don’t form properly. Children born with a faulty version of souffle have a condition known as hereditary spastic paraplegia, where they gradually lose the use of their legs. By understanding how souffle works in model systems like these fish eggs, researchers can start to figure out what’s going wrong in the human disease and search for future treatments.
Written by Kat Arney
—
Adapted from image by Roland Dosch and colleaguesGeorg-August Universitaet GoettingenOriginally published under a Creative Commons Licence (BY 4.0)Research published in PLOS Genetics, June 2014
—
You can also follow BPoD on Twitter and Facebook

bpod-mrc:

14 July 2014

Buses and Blobs

Just as cities are full of buses – shuttling people around to school, work, play or home – our cells are bustling with tiny transporters that do a similar job. These fluffy-looking balls are zebrafish eggs, stained with a fluorescent dye that reveals these blobby biological buses, known as vesicles, packed with molecules rather than passengers. But there’s a key difference between them – the one on the left is normal, while the one on the right is missing a gene called souffle (also known as spastizin), so the vesicles don’t form properly. Children born with a faulty version of souffle have a condition known as hereditary spastic paraplegia, where they gradually lose the use of their legs. By understanding how souffle works in model systems like these fish eggs, researchers can start to figure out what’s going wrong in the human disease and search for future treatments.

Written by Kat Arney

Adapted from image by Roland Dosch and colleagues
Georg-August Universitaet Goettingen
Originally published under a Creative Commons Licence (BY 4.0)
Research published in PLOS Genetics, June 2014

You can also follow BPoD on Twitter and Facebook

さつき盆栽花季展 / Satsuki azalea bonsai exhibition

(via onlinebabe)

perpetualartistsblock:

What better way to break out of artist’s block (for now) than with a newly described microraptorine?Here we have Changyuraptor in all it’s stupidly-long-tail-feathered glory.

perpetualartistsblock:

What better way to break out of artist’s block (for now) than with a newly described microraptorine?

Here we have Changyuraptor in all it’s stupidly-long-tail-feathered glory.

(via fuckyeahdinoart)

zerostatereflex:

Jupiter’s Synchrotron Emission 
"Movie made from observations of Jupiter by the radio telescopes of the Very Large Array. Jupiter’s spin axis is offset from its magnetic poles - meaning Jupiter has a "true north" and "magnetic north" like our planet does."

zerostatereflex:

Jupiter’s Synchrotron Emission

"Movie made from observations of Jupiter by the radio telescopes of the Very Large Array. Jupiter’s spin axis is offset from its magnetic poles - meaning Jupiter has a "true north" and "magnetic north" like our planet does."

(via starstuffblog)

vuls:

Copper Splash + Oxide

vuls:

Copper Splash + Oxide

(via ddaughter)

scienceisbeauty:

Tamu Massif, part of the Shatsky Rise in the western Pacific Ocean. Via Ars Technica.
Google Maps:

scienceisbeauty:

Tamu Massif, part of the Shatsky Rise in the western Pacific Ocean. Via Ars Technica.

Google Maps:

(via starstuffblog)

(Source: noirlac)

bpod-mrc:

14 July 2014
Buses and Blobs
Just as cities are full of buses – shuttling people around to school, work, play or home – our cells are bustling with tiny transporters that do a similar job. These fluffy-looking balls are zebrafish eggs, stained with a fluorescent dye that reveals these blobby biological buses, known as vesicles, packed with molecules rather than passengers. But there’s a key difference between them – the one on the left is normal, while the one on the right is missing a gene called souffle (also known as spastizin), so the vesicles don’t form properly. Children born with a faulty version of souffle have a condition known as hereditary spastic paraplegia, where they gradually lose the use of their legs. By understanding how souffle works in model systems like these fish eggs, researchers can start to figure out what’s going wrong in the human disease and search for future treatments.
Written by Kat Arney
—
Adapted from image by Roland Dosch and colleaguesGeorg-August Universitaet GoettingenOriginally published under a Creative Commons Licence (BY 4.0)Research published in PLOS Genetics, June 2014
—
You can also follow BPoD on Twitter and Facebook

bpod-mrc:

14 July 2014

Buses and Blobs

Just as cities are full of buses – shuttling people around to school, work, play or home – our cells are bustling with tiny transporters that do a similar job. These fluffy-looking balls are zebrafish eggs, stained with a fluorescent dye that reveals these blobby biological buses, known as vesicles, packed with molecules rather than passengers. But there’s a key difference between them – the one on the left is normal, while the one on the right is missing a gene called souffle (also known as spastizin), so the vesicles don’t form properly. Children born with a faulty version of souffle have a condition known as hereditary spastic paraplegia, where they gradually lose the use of their legs. By understanding how souffle works in model systems like these fish eggs, researchers can start to figure out what’s going wrong in the human disease and search for future treatments.

Written by Kat Arney

Adapted from image by Roland Dosch and colleagues
Georg-August Universitaet Goettingen
Originally published under a Creative Commons Licence (BY 4.0)
Research published in PLOS Genetics, June 2014

You can also follow BPoD on Twitter and Facebook

(Source: 4est, via hallodjozsi)

humanoidhistory:

Alien (1979)

humanoidhistory:

Alien (1979)

(via eswynn)

(Source: buddhabrot, via hallodjozsi)

(Source: acidacidic, via hallodjozsi)

About:

www.nicholascueva.com